My take on Mindset Tax in coaching

I recently wrote about “coaching tax” and suggested that we should focus on making sure we optimise our “time on task” when coaching, but I got the idea for a coaching tax from the concept of the “Mindset Tax.” In this article I want to look at the difference between a mindset tax (the time spent not being able to grow) and a thinking trap (being trapped in your own unhelpful story or thinking pattern). Both are relevant to coaching and it helps to be aware of them. Defining the term “mindset tax” When coaching, we want people to gain … Continue reading My take on Mindset Tax in coaching

Tweaked goal – more action

I find that when I set goals, I often need to test them out and then refine them. No matter how hard I think about things up front, I always find room for improvement as soon as I start pursuing the goal. I recently set a goal of “read someone else’s writing once a fortnight” because I thought I should make more time for reading. This seemed good at the time but I now realise it was pretty bad. Firstly “reading” was ill defined. I skim a lot of articles but rarely read them properly. So I decided to tweak … Continue reading Tweaked goal – more action

Never miss the goal twice

At the start of this year, I wanted to get back into writing. I used to keep a journal and I have maintained this blog for a long time. I was still writing some presentations and workshops at work but I missed writing entire training courses and user guides. The problem was that I did not have a big dream or vision for a world changing novel and the people at work were not looking for a whole new agile training curriculum. So I decided to start small and commit to writing 2 blog articles a month. It was a … Continue reading Never miss the goal twice

Coaching tax – the movie version

I thought this was about coaching tax Last week I wrote about “coaching tax” from the perspective of being in a coaching conversation (time on task) versus not being in a coaching conversation. This week I thought I would write an article about “coaching tax” from the perspective of the coach who is already engaged in a coaching conversation. Once we are “on task” we are actually coaching someone. This is the moment that we yearned for, where the insights and the self-motivated call to action comes out and the coach can sit back an marvel at the transformation that … Continue reading Coaching tax – the movie version

Do coaches pay tax (part one: time on task)

I love coaching I like to believe that coaching has a really positive impact on the person being coached. At best it is a “generative conversation” that leads to either new action or new insight. I have heard this summarised as discovering what is “next or new.” When coaching an individual, the conversation is one sided because it is all about, and all for the benefit of, the person being coached. This differs from collaborative problem solving where both participants share the burden of thinking, listening and talking. It also differs from normal conversations over coffee which are often a … Continue reading Do coaches pay tax (part one: time on task)

Moving into the Learning or coaching zone

We sometimes talk about moving out of your comfort zone so that you can really stretch yourself and thereby grow more. Moving out of your comfort zone can, however, be a bit harder than we make it sound. But why is it hard? Overcoming inertia One reason is inertia. We are not making the deliberate choice to stay stuck in our ways, but actually we are kind of used to doing things the way we do them now. Being good people we decide to make a change, but thinking about the change actually kicks off a series of reactions in … Continue reading Moving into the Learning or coaching zone

Zones of growth 2 – managing the journey

My last article, I suggested that we should move out of our comfort zone in order to learn and grow. I looked at how you can target specific areas for growth and then volunteer for scary adventures that take you through “the fear zone” and into a longer term learning zone where you continue to grow (or where you can use delegation to encourage others to do the same thing). I think that leaving your comfort zone and facing your fears in order to generate real learning more is good, but I don’t think the model I shared is complete. … Continue reading Zones of growth 2 – managing the journey

Zones of growth 1 – growth and delegation

I recently participated in a workshop where we discussed the growth mindset and the need to push yourself our of your comfort zone in order to learn and grow. We spoke about the need to move out of our comfort zone if we want learn and grow. When you come out of your comfort zone, though, it is scary and you enter the “fear zone.”  The fear zone is where you do not know what to do next, or you are not confident that you can do it as well as you want to.  This is a vulnerable place and … Continue reading Zones of growth 1 – growth and delegation

We gave a presentation on defining a great Product Owner

Tom Angove and I gave a talk today on what we think a great product owner is. We were at the IIBA “Festival of Business Analysis,” so there were quite a few people who knew what a Product Owner was. I would love to say that the talk consisted or erudite guidance from the presenters and passionate, persuasive recommendations that caused the audience to take immediate action on leaving the presentation. Unfortunately I don’t have much evidence to support that claim. What I can say is that we got no where near the end of the material we could have … Continue reading We gave a presentation on defining a great Product Owner

The pull of the tangible and the pull of the past

I am supposed to be working on a talk I am doing in a couple of days. I have some time available and some rare space to think. So of course I have started reading some books on topics that have nothing to do with my talk, and I am pondering how these impact life at work in areas that are, again, nothing to do with my talk. I was reading “What Philosophy can teach you about being a better leader,” by Alison Reynolds and others. The theory They raise a point they call “Tyranny of the tangible” that I … Continue reading The pull of the tangible and the pull of the past