Moving at the same pace involves ongoing growth

By introducing effective feedback loops rather than long slow pieces of work, teams learn faster and thus have the opportunity to substantially improve the value of the product that they create or the service that they provide. But this is only half of the advantage of implementing effective feedback loops. If you believe that team members, with all their diverse skills and abilities, are valuable assets, then the same feedback loops should also allow the team to more effectively invest in their own development, becoming an ever stronger team over time. To me, this is actually the greatest advantages of … Continue reading Moving at the same pace involves ongoing growth

If people are assets, can we claim depreciation on them?

I sometimes talk about people as resources, even though I am told not to. Apparently people should be called “talent” or even “people,” but I have an old mindset and I still think of them as people who should also be useful if they are in this team. I also still think about questions like: Are we the right people to get this done? What do we really need to Excel at here? What can we do at a basic level? and What should we learn from this to do this better next time? These sound like people focused questions … Continue reading If people are assets, can we claim depreciation on them?

Using a story wall to add learning

A story wall helps us to focus our attention on the present, by allowing us to take a snapshot of the state of our work in any given moment. Doing so allows us to see bottlenecks and priorities and generally take better control of our work in progress. But in my last article I mentioned that we can extend the use of our story wall to help the team apply “second loop learning” as well as managing their daily work. I do not intend to explore second loop learning here again in detail, but I do intend to show how … Continue reading Using a story wall to add learning

What happened to double loop learning in agile?

Back in my day times were hard I don’t want to shock you, but my corporate life began last century, before even Twitter and Slack existed. You can imagine how slow moving and inefficient we were, but we knew we could do better and so we focused on improving. We came up with many new ideas, both large and small. Some were great, like empowered work cells, while others turned out to be ineffective and were quickly forgotten. We also learned from our corporate elders, some of whom lived so long ago that they remembered communicating by paper based letters. … Continue reading What happened to double loop learning in agile?